What to Expect During an IRS Audit

What to Expect During an IRS Audit

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Making a mistake on your taxes can have disastrous consequences. Inconsistent and inaccurate tax returns can lead to an IRS audit. The IRS can assess significant penalties, interest charges, and even jail time for tax fraud.

To avoid making a mistake on your taxes, it is important to understand the tax laws and keep good records. You should also use a reputable tax preparation software or service.

If you do make a mistake on your taxes, the best thing to do is to correct it as soon as possible. The sooner you fix the problem, the less likely you are to face severe penalties from the IRS. In this article, we’ll discuss everything you need to know about an IRS audit and how to avoid one.

What is an IRS Audit?

An IRS audit is an examination of your tax return by the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS can select your return for an audit randomly, or because something on your return appears to be incorrect.

If you are selected for an audit, the IRS will send you a notice in the mail. The notice will specify what type of audit you are being subjected to. There are three types of audits: office audits, field audits, and correspondence audits.

The vast majority of audits are conducted through correspondence. A correspondence audit is conducted entirely through the mail. The IRS will send you a notice asking you to verify certain information on your return. You will have to respond to the IRS with documentation supporting your position.

Why Have I Been Selected for an Audit?

The IRS uses a variety of methods to select tax returns for audits. Some returns are selected at random. Others are selected because they contain errors or discrepancies. And some returns are selected because the taxpayer has a history of filing inaccurate returns.

If you have been selected for an audit, it does not necessarily mean that you have done anything wrong. However, it is important to take the audit process seriously and respond to the IRS in a timely and accurate manner.

What Happens if I Am Selected for an Audit?

If you are selected for an audit, the first thing you should do is review the notice that you received from the IRS. The notice will specify what type of audit you are being subjected to and what documentation you need to provide.

If you are being audited by correspondence, you will need to respond to the IRS with the requested documentation. Once the IRS receives your response, they will review your case and determine if you owe any additional taxes.

If you are being audited in person, you will need to meet with an IRS agent at a specified time and location. The agent will review your tax return and ask you questions about specific items on your return. You will need to provide supporting documentation for your position.

At the end of the audit, the IRS will determine if you owe any additional taxes. If you do owe additional taxes, you will be required to pay them plus interest and penalties.

What Happens if I Disagree with the Audit Results?

If you disagree with the results of the audit, you have the right to appeal the decision. You will need to file a formal appeal with the IRS within 30 days of receiving the audit notice.

The appeals process is conducted by a separate division of the IRS. An appeals officer will review your case and determine if the original decision was correct.

If you still disagree with the decision, you have the option of taking your case to federal court. However, this is a very costly and time-consuming process.

How Can I Avoid an Audit?

There are several things you can do to avoid being selected for an audit. First, make sure that you accurately report all income on your tax return. The IRS receives copies of all 1099 forms and W-2 forms that are issued to taxpayers. If you fail to report the income that is reported on these forms, you are more likely to be selected for an audit.

Second, take care to accurately calculate your deductions and credits. The IRS has sophisticated computer programs that flag returns with large deductions or credits. If your return is flagged, you are more likely to be selected for an audit.

Third, make sure that you file your return on time. Taxpayers who file their returns late are more likely to be audited than taxpayers who file on time.

Fourth, if you are self-employed, make sure that you pay your estimated taxes on time. Self-employed taxpayers who fail to pay their estimated taxes are more likely to be audited.

Finally, if you receive a notice from the IRS asking you to verify information on your return, respond to the notice promptly and accurately.

By following these simple tips, you can avoid being selected for an audit. However, even if you do everything right, there is still a chance that you could be audited. If this happens, don’t panic. Just follow the instructions in the notice and cooperate with the IRS agent.

How Do I Know if the IRS Received My Response?

If you respond to an audit notice by mail, you should send your response by certified mail with a return receipt requested. This will give you proof that the IRS received your response.

If you respond to an audit notice online, you can check the status of your case by logging into your account on the IRS website.

What if I Can’t Pay the Amount I Owe?

If you owe taxes and you cannot pay the full amount, you should contact the IRS to discuss your payment options. The IRS may be able to set up a payment plan for you.

If you cannot pay the full amount of taxes that you owe, it is important to file your tax return on time and pay as much as you can. This will minimize the interest and penalties that you owe.

What are My Rights?

The IRS is required to follow certain procedures when conducting audits. These procedures are designed to protect your rights as a taxpayer.

For example, the IRS cannot seize your property without a court order. The IRS also cannot require you to sign a waiver of your rights.

If you feel that your rights have been violated, you can file a complaint with the Taxpayer Advocate Service. The Taxpayer Advocate Service is an independent organization within the IRS that helps taxpayers who are experiencing financial difficulties or who have problems with the IRS.

How Far Back Can the IRS Go into My Return History?

The IRS has a three-year statute of limitations on audits. This means that the IRS can only go back three years when auditing your return. However, there are some exceptions to this rule.

If you do not file a return, the IRS has no time limit on how far back it can go into your return history. The same is true if you file a fraudulent return.

If you underreport your income by more than 25%, the IRS has six years to audit your return. Finally, if you fail to pay taxes that you owe, the IRS has 10 years to collect the taxes.

Conclusion

No one likes to be audited by the IRS. However, if you are selected for an audit, it is important to cooperate with the IRS and follow their instructions.

By following the tips in this article, you can minimize your chances of being audited. However, even if you do everything right, there is still a chance that you could be selected for an audit. If this happens, don’t panic. Just follow the instructions in the notice and cooperate with the IRS agent.

 

If you want accurate bookkeeping for your business and to avoid IRS audits, consider hiring a reputable accounting firm. One of the trusted accounting firms in Florida is Swiftbooks, LLC. Call 786-204-2881 today to help your business keep its financial records straight!

Further Reading

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